Descriptions

BLS 110 African Civilization I (Formerly CUB 3103) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
This course is designed to provide a broad acquaintance with African history, civilization, and culture from the earliest times to the 16th century. The course will discuss the origins and development of civilization in Africa, focusing on the oral civilizations, ancient African kingdoms, the African middle ages, traditional and foreign missionary religions, and Africa before the advent of the Europeans.
BLS 112 African Civilization II (Formerly CUB 3104) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
This course is designed to provide a broad acquaintance with modern African social history, civilization, and culture. After a quick overview of the period of Oral Civilization and the colonial partition of Africa, the continuity and development of African culture and civilization will be analyzed: its social and political institutions, its people and the growing social issues which confront African society today. The course will explore the social, political, economic, and intellectual dimensions of African life through a wide variety of readings from the various disciplines of history, anthropology, political science, literature, music, and the arts.
BLS 114 The African-American Experience (Formerly CUB 3106) 3 credits / 3 hours
The student will be introduced, through a series of guided readings, to the experiences of peoples of African descent from Africa's genesis through the middle passage, slavery, emancipation, the reconstruction and the aftermath of de jure slavery in the Americas.The literary, economic, socio-psychological, and cultural aspects of the African-American experience till the end of the 19th century will be discussed and analyzed.
BLS 116 African-American Religion (Formerly CUB 3119) 3 credits, 3 hours
The student will trace the history of African-American religion as a continuation of African religions as well as a response to the experience of the Diaspora. Major emphasis will be placed on the church as an integral part of the African-American community.
BLS 119 Diversity & Pluralism in America 3 credits / 3 hours
Co-requisite: SPA 121 or ENG 091
This foundation course is the study of various racial, ethnic and cultural and cultural components of the Americas society from the 16th century to the present. Historical and contemporary issues of the American mosiac will be surveyed as they relate to race, ethnicity, religion, cultural diversity and pluralism. The course will explore a variety of theoretical perspectives and empirical cases in assimilation, discrimination and reverse discrimination, integration, racism, segregation, social harmony, coexistence, and the future of racial and ethnic groups and cultures in the United States. This is, therefore, a course aimed at understanding and analyzing the various situations of our different and differing American populations, suggesting a comparative comprehension of various patterns of group relations.
BLS 120 Social Problems of the Minority Communities (Formerly CUB 3124) 3 credits, 3 hours
The student will analyze various aspects of social problems which affect disadvantaged and multicultural communities, including drugs, housing, welfare, and crime, with respect to their etiology, as well as strategies for amelioration.
BLS 121 African Literature (Formerly CUB 3172) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ENG 111
The student will identify the main sources and trace the thematic development of African oral and written literature. The student will discuss and evaluate the contribution of literature to African historiography. The student will discuss, analyze, and criticize representative works from such countries as Nigeria, Kenya, and Ethiopia. The works considered will be from the earliest times to the present. Credit will be awarded in either English or Africana Studies.
BLS 122 Negritude (Formerly CUB 310) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre/Co-requisites: ENG 091; ESL 091
This course is designed to explore the cultural, literary, intellectual, political, moral, artistic and social values of people of Africa and the African Diaspora as represented in the literature of the Negritude Movement. The course will trace the development of Negritude as a political, literary, cultural, moral movement which attempts to rehabilitate the people of African descent from the psychological and moral degradation of slavery, colonialism and imperialism. The inter-relationship between the Negritude Movement, the Harlem Renaissance and the Pan Africanist Movement will be explored. The critique of Negritude by Anglo-phone African writers and intellectuals will be examined. The issue of alienation, and the dilemma of the assimilated African (l'evolue, l'assimile) will be emphasized.
BLS 123 African-American Literature (Formerly CUB 3174) 3 credits / 3 hours
The student will survey the literature from the slave narratives to the present time. S/he will relate the literature to the historical and cultural context in which it is set. S/he will analyze and criticize such writers as Isaac Jefferson, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and John A. Williams. Credit will be awarded in English and Africana Studies.
BLS 125 The Harlem Renaissance (Formerly CUB 320) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre/Co-requisites: ENG 110
This course is designed to explore the socio-political environment and evolution of Afro-Americans as reflected in the literature of the Harlem Renaissance (1919-1939) in drama, fiction, poetry and other forms of artistic expression. Students will study the relation of the various changes taking place on the social and political scenes during the first four decades of the twentieth century. The birth of the "New Negro", the impact of black Art and Music first in Europe and in the United States will be treated through its literature of justification/revolt or literature of racial/ethnic promotion, cultural awareness and identity. The course will compare the works of key figures of the Harlem Renaissance such as Claude Mckay, Counte Cullen, Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer and those of writers of the "lost generation" such as Hemingway and Fitzgerald. New themes and forms developed by the Renaissance writers and their influence on succeeding generations will be studied.
BLS 131 Black-American Art (Formerly CUB 3178) 3 credits / 3 hours
The student will be able to trace the major works of art from the earliest times to the present. S/he will analyze the works of art in relation to the cultural and social conditions under which they were produced. The works of Henry Tanner, Aaron Douglas, Charles White, and others will be considered.
BLS 133 African-American Music (Formerly CUB 3180) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: VPA 141- Music Appreciation
The students will trace the music of African-Americans from Africa, their development in the Diaspora and the various musical forms up to the present time. The student will analyze the functions of the "holler," work songs, blues, jazz, and other forms.
BLS 141 The African-American & Latino Family (Formerly CUB 3116) 3 credits / 3 hours
The student will consider the family as a social institution and those behavior patterns that are specific to the African- American and Latino family. Emphasis will be placed on the affective influence of the family environment
BLS 150 Ethnicity, Health & Illness (Formerly CUB 3130) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ESL 091
The student will survey the literature from the slave narratives to the present time. S/he will relate the literature to the historical and cultural context in which it is set. S/he will analyze and criticize such writers as Isaac Jefferson, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and John A. Williams. Credit will be awarded in English and Africana Studies.
FRE 101 Elementary French I (Formerly FRE 1901) 4 credits / 4 hours
This course introduces the basic elements of the language by providing a foundation in grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary. Using a communicative approach, students will learn listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in cultural and social contexts. One weekly hour of work in the Language Lab is required.
FRE 102 Elementary French II (Formerly FRE 1902) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: FRE 101 or by placement
This course will continue to develop communicative skills for basic social functions in various cultural contexts. Films and other cultural texts will be used to enhance and support learning. One weekly hour of work in the Language Lab is required.
FRE 201 Intermediate French I (Formerly FRE 1903) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: FRE 102 or by placement
The student will demonstrate self-expression in French through a systematic review of grammar and the reading and discussion of selected prose and poetry in class. The student will use the language laboratory for supplementary oral drill.
FRE 202 Intermediate French II (Formerly FRE 1904) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: FRE 201 or by placement
The student will demonstrate self-expression in French through continued systematic review of grammar, the reading and discussion of the works of selected contemporary writers, and the presentation of written and oral reports based on current periodicals, happenings, subjects or personal interest. The student will use the language laboratory for supplementary oral drill.
FRE 321 French Culture & Science (Formerly FRE 1921) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisites: FRE 202 or by placement
TThe student will read and discuss key excerpts of works by French thinkers who reflect contemporary culture and values. Through classroom demonstrations, the student will identify major research contributions of renowned French scientists, one of whom will be chosen for the written and oral report. Offered in French.
FRE 324 African Literature in French (Formerly FRE 1924) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: FRE 202 or by placement
The student will read, discuss, and prepare written or oral reports on the imaginative didactic works of such contemporary African writers as Oyono, Diop, Senghor, Camara Laye, and Franz Fanon and Aime Cesaire of the Caribbean. Philosophies such as "La Negritude" will be analyzed as well as political, economic, aesthetic, and linguistic trends in the African nations represented by these men of letters. Offered in French.
FRE 370 Extensive Readings in French (Formerly FRE 1970) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: FRE 202 or by placement
The student will read five to seven works from a list recommended
by the instructor or suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student will submit a written report on each of the readings and will meet with the instructor to discuss these reports.
HUM 3001 Introduction to the Humanities 3 credits / 3 hours
Co-requisite: SPA 121 or ENG 091
This course will introduce the student to the richness and variety of the Humanities, presenting the various fields involved: Philosophy, Literature, Art, and History. This will allow the student to discover a sense of relationships among life, work, and circumstances, to understand self and society from different times and places and through different eyes, and to reflect on the way personal origins and beliefs affect actions and values.
BLS 119 Diversity & Pluralism in America (Formerly HUM 3021) 3 credits / 3 hours
Co-requisite: SPA 121 or ENG 091
This foundation course is the study of various racial, ethnic and cultural components of the American society from the 16th century to the present. Historical and contemporary issues of the American mosaic will be surveyed as they relate to race, ethnicity, religion, cultural diversity, and pluralism. The course will explore a variety of theoretical perspectives and empirical cases in assimilation, discrimination and reverse discrimination, integration, racism, segregation, social harmony, coexistence, and the future of racial and ethnic groups and cultures in the United States. This is, therefore, a course aimed at understanding and analyzing the various situations of our different and differing American populations, suggesting a comparative comprehension of various patterns of group relations.
ITA 101 Elementary Italian I 4 credits / 4 hours
(Formerly CUP 3210)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 when offered in English; SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
This course introduces the basic elements of the language by providing a foundation in grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary. Using a communicative approach, students will learn listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in cultural and social contexts. One weekly hour of work in the Language Lab is required. (Through fall 2004, ITA 2101 3 credits, 3 hours)
ITA 102 Elementary Italian II 4 credits / 4hours
(Formerly CUP 3218)
Pre-requisite: ITA 101/2101 or by placement
Co-requisite: none
This course will continue to develop communicative skills for basic social functions in various cultural contexts. Films and other cultural texts will be used to enhance and support learning. One weekly hour of work in the Language Lab is required. (Through fall 2004, ITA 2102 3 credits, 3 hours)
ITA 201 Intermediate Italian I 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ITA 102 or placement
Co-requisite: none
This course continues to develop the basic language skills learned in Elementary Italian I and II. Conversation drills and selected readings will enhance oral and written expression and will provide an understanding of Italian culture.
ITA 202 Intermediate Italian II 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ITA 201
Co-requisite: None
This course is a continuation of Italian 201. It integrates vocabulary and grammar in new contexts and enhances the students' ability to speak and write at a higher level. Students will read short passages by major Italian authors and will be introduced to the vocabulary of genre, poetics, and literary appreciation.
LAC 104 History of Puerto Rico 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3204)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English; SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
The student will discuss the geography of the island; the events that led to the advent of Spain in America; the Spanish conquest and colonization of Borinquen; the later transformation of the island from an unprofitable mine to a military garrison by the end of the 16th century; the factors leading to the economic, military, and population deterioration of the island during the 17th century. The student will discuss and analyze the turn of events that improved conditions on the island during the 18th century, especially the reforms promoted by Marshall O'Reilly.
LAC 106 History of Dominican Republic 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3346)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English or SPA 222 or SPA 202 or higher when offered in Spanish
The student will discuss the geography of Hispaniola. The student will also discuss and analyze: the events that led to the arrival of Spain in America; the subsequent Spanish conquest and colonization; the relations of Santo Domingo, Haiti, and France; the historical turn of events in the 19th century; the political and economic factors that led to U.S. intervention, the new "caudillismo" and the Trujillo regime.
LAC 252 History of the Caribbean and Latin American Art 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3252)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English; SPA 222 or SPA 202 or higher when offered in Spanish.
This course will present an overview of contemporary Latin American and Caribbean art. This course will underscore the African heritage of the island nations, the political nature of Latin American art, and particular attention will be placed on the art of the Dominican Republic, Taino Indians and Puerto Rico.
LAC 108 History of the Caribbean 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3208)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English; SPA 121 when offered in Spanish.
The student will discuss the concept of history and its application to the historical and geographical reality of the Caribbean. The varied colonial developments of the area and their effects upon the development of a modern Caribbean community will be analyzed. The student will compare the historical and geographical differences of the area in order to develop personal interpretations of the Caribbean reality based upon careful analysis. The student will also compile facts, categorize, explain, analyze, and summarize historical events in the different written assignments that will be given.
LAC 109 History of Latin America I Winter 2 credits / 2 hours 
Summer 3 credits /3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3209)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 when offered in English; SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
The student will discuss the concepts of history and civilization in order to apply these concepts to the realities of Pre- Colombian America. The student will study and explain the historical development of colonial Latin America, its foundation, growth, and institutions. The student will be able to appraise the effects of colonial policies upon later growth and developments in Latin America.
LAC 110 History of Latin America II 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3210)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 when offered in English; SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
The student will summarize colonial developments and view their effects upon the revolutionary struggle. The student will identify the different historical states of independent Latin America, analyzing the roles of revolution and reaction upon growth and stagnation. The student will view historical developments in 20th century Latin America, and will be able to relate and integrate national events and regional variables.
LAC 118 Caribbean Society & Culture 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3218)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 when offered in English;or
SPA 121 or higher when offered in Spanish
This course will provide a general perspective on the different territories that comprise the modern Caribbean, including the Hispanic and non-Hispanic Caribbean. Organized by themes, the assigned readings and class discussions will focus on the region's political development, economic history, women's status, issues of race and racism, the development of popular music, and contemporary labor migrations.
LAC 132 Hispanic Migration to the United States 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3232)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 when offered in English;or
SPA 121 or higher when offered in Spanish
This course will survey the major Hispanic migrations to the United States during the twentieth century, particularly in the period after 1960. Consideration will be given to Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, and Dominican settlement in this country. In each case, attention will be drawn to the political, social, and economic forces that influenced migration, the history of the movement of these groups to the U.S., their impact on society, and their current socio-economic status in the United States. Additional subtopics include: the conditions of Latinos in U.S. society and their contribution to the economy, the particular experiences of Hispanic women, the portrayal of Latinos in the mass media, and contemporary Hispanic migration to this country from other areas of the Caribbean, Central America and South America.
LAC 216 The African Presence Caribbean & Latin American 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3216)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English; SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
This course will trace the history of people of African origin from their arrival in the Americas through the first half of the twentieth century. It will examine the African slave trade, slave rebellions and resistance, and the presence of people of African origin in the various countries and territories of Latin America and the Caribbean. In addition, the class will consider the cultural, social, and political contributions of people of African origin to the Americas, as well as the problems of race and racism in the Caribbean and Latin America. Although not required, it is recommended that students registering for this class also take the CUB African Civilization I course.
LAC 244 Women in Caribbean & Latin American Literature 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3344))
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English or SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
Co-requisite: SPA 222 or above
The student will discuss and analyze women as a creative force in Caribbean and Latin American literature; appraise their contribution to and influence on the various genres; and discuss, analyze, and interpret their involvement in social, political, and cultural conflicts as contained in literary works. The student will discuss and analyze their different roles as portrayed in the works of major writers; and trace the evolution of the concept of womanhood in the various literary movements from the 19th through the early twenty first century.
LAC 246 Latino Literature in the United States 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3346)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English or SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
Co-requisite: SPA 222 or above
This course will focus on the literature of the Latino population in the United States. It begins with an overview of Hispanic literary production in this country and a brief survey of the writings of the early Spanish explorers and colonizers of what is now the U.S. Organized by themes, the course will examine the Latino experience as it is reflected in the literature of the Hispanic population of the United States. Major topics to be considered include the literature of the immigration, the defense of culture and civil rights, attempts to preserve cultural traditions, militant aesthetics, and contemporary reflections on identity.
LAC 252 History of the Caribbean and Latin American Art 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3252)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English or SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
Co-requisite: SPA 222 or above
This course will present an overview of contemporary Latin American and Caribbean art. This course will underscore the African heritage of the island nations, the political nature of Latin American art, and particular attention will be placed on the art of the Dominican Republic, Taino Indians and Puerto Rico.
LAC 262 History of the Caribbean and Latin American Popular Music 3 credits / 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3362)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English or SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
Co-requisite: SPA 222 or above
This course will examine the history of music in the Caribbean and Latin America, as well as the history of Latin Music in the United States. Students will study the development of musical traditions in the various countries of Latin America and the island territories of the Caribbean. The class will also focus on the history of Latin American music in the United States and its influence on the music from the early years of the twentieth century to the present. It is recommended that students registering for this class also take VPA 3552 Music Appreciation.
LAC 290 Seminar & Fieldwork in Caribbean Society & Culture Winter 2 credits, 2 hours; Summer 3 credits, 3 hours
(Formerly FRE 3290)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English or SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
Co-requisite: SPA 222 or above
This is an academic course used as a course equivalent for the Study Abroad Program for seminar and fieldwork in the Caribbean (the geographical location - Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic and Cuba - will be identified by section-specific codes), and conducted in Spanish or English. Recommended for third semester Hostos/CUNY undergraduate students. The course focuses on the most relevant aspects of Caribbean history, culture and society. To reach these goals, participants will have the opportunity of meeting and working with academicians, intellectuals and artists, while participating in the everyday life of the country. The students will be able to appraise people's lifestyles and problems and relate to them in their natural environment. Participants will thus be able to obtain a clear view of the country, and of its place in the Caribbean. Academic lectures will be held in the morning and the afternoon will be occupied with fieldwork experience, including field trips to institutional settings, historical sites, museums, art galleries, and artists' studios. Guided by notable academicians, the students will be able to distinguish between fact and stereotypes, and between folk and scientific knowledge. The students will compile facts, categorize, explain, analyze, and summarize them in written term papers. This course will be offered during the winter (three (3) weeks) and/or summer (four (4) weeks).
LAC 350 Hostos & Marti: Trailblazers for Freedom & Progress in the Americas 3 credits, 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3350)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English or SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
Co-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or higher when offered in
Spanish.
This course follows the lives of Eugenio María de Hostos and José Martí through their literature, their endeavors, achievements and contributions to the struggles for freedom, education and progress in the Americas. Students will read, analyze, discuss and gain an understanding of these authors' major works in a historical, political, and literary context. Students will study Hostos and Martí's historical presence in New York City in the later part of the 19th century, and their activism for the selfdetermination and social development of their peoples. Students will also gain an appreciation for similarities and differences between these two important writers, and will explore their legacies to Latin American and Latino intellectual and political pursuits.
LAC 360 The Life of Eugenio María de Hostos 3 credits, 3 hours
(Formerly CUP 3360)
Pre-requisite: ESL 091 or ENG 091 or higher when offered in English or SPA 121 when offered in Spanish
Co-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or higher when offered in Spanish
The course is devoted to the study of the life, works and contributions of Eugenio María de Hostos to the political, social and cultural development of Latin America and the Caribbean. Students will read, discuss and analyze Hostos' most significant works, including his literary writings, gain an understanding of this writer's work and significance in a historical context, and appreciate through exchanges with special guests and visiting scholars the relevance of Hostos' thinking to present-day Latin American and Latino issues.
SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I 4 credits, 4 hours
 
Elementary Spanish I introduces the basic elements of the language by providing a foundation in grammar, pronunciation and vocabulary. Using a communicative approach, students will learn listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in cultural and social contexts. One weekly hour of work in the Language Lab is required.
SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II 4 credits, 4 hours
(Formerly SPA 2202)
Pre-requisite: SPA 101 or by placement
Co-requisite: none
Elementary Spanish II will continue to develop communicative skills for basic social functions in various cultural contexts. Films and other cultural texts will be used to enhance and support learning. One weekly hour of work in the Language Lab is required.
SPA 117 Spanish for English Dominant Hispanics I 3 credits, 3 hours
(Formerly SPA 2217)
Pre-requisite: by placement
The course is designed for students of Hispanic background born and/or educated in the United States, who wish to develop skills in speaking, reading, and writing. This is achieved through a review of Spanish grammar and illustrative readings.
SPA 118 Spanish for English Dominant Hispanics II 3 credits, 3 hours
(Formerly SPA 2218)
Pre-requisite: SPA 117 or by placement
Continuation of SPA 117, but with special emphasis on reading and composition skills, spelling, and paragraph organization.
SPA 121 Spanish Composition I 3 credits, 3 hours
(Formerly SPA 2221)
Pre-requisite: by placement
This course deals with enhancement of oral and written use of the Spanish language, emphasizing its specific forms of writing (narration, description, definition, exposition); its reading comprehension and its grammatical structure. The course will gradually develop the students' ability to think logically and critically. Precision of vocabulary, coherence, and transferability of skills for learning a second language will be reinforced.
SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I 3 credits, 3 hours
(Formerly SPA 2203)
Pre-requisite: SPA 102 or by placement
The student will demonstrate self-expression in Spanish through a systematic review of grammar and the reading and discussion of selected prose and poetry in class. The student will use the language laboratory for supplementary oral drill.
SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II 3 credits, 3 hours
(Formerly SPA 2204)
Pre-requisite: SPA 201 or by placement
The student will demonstrate self-expression in Spanish through continued systematic review of grammar, the reading and discussion of the works of selected contemporary writers, and the presentation of written and oral reports based on current periodicals, happenings, subjects, or personal interest. The student will use the language laboratory for supplementary oral drill.
SPA 222 Basic Spanish Composition II 3 credits, 3 hours
(Formerly SPA 2222)
Pre-requisite: SPA 121 or by placement
The student will learn to develop techniques of exposition, comparison and contrast, analogy, definition, and persuasion to create coherent compositions and elements of term paper writing. The importance of syntax, orthography, and punctuation will be stressed. Reading comprehension will serve as an important component of this course.
SPA 223 Advanced Spanish Composition 3 credits, 3 hours
(Formerly SPA 2223)
Pre-requisite: 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will demonstrate the ability to present ideas effectively in written Spanish through expository, descriptive, narrative, and persuasive compositions.
SPA 300 Introduction to Literature (Formerly SPA 2230) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will analyze and discuss, orally and in writing, readings in the literary genres selected from representative authors from Spanish, Latin American, and world literature
SPA 333 Spanish American Literature I (Formerly SPA 2233) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will read representative short works by writers from the colonial period through those of the 19th century Spanish American countries, with emphasis on the latter century; participate in literary discussions based on readings and lectures presented by the instructor; and prepare oral and written reports.
SPA 334 Spanish American Literature II (Formerly SPA 2234) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
A continuation of SPA 333. The student will read representative works of contemporary writers, participate in literary discussions based on readings and lectures presented by the instructor, and prepare oral and written reports.
SPA 336 Caribbean Literature (Formerly SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will read, analyze, and discuss selections from the contemporary literature of Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico, paying special attention to the political, social, and cultural aspects of each work. Written and oral reports are required.
SPA 338 The Spanish American Short Story (Formerly SPA 2238) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will read representative short stories by Spanish American writers; participate in literary discussion based on the readings; and prepare both oral and written reports.
SPA 340 The Contemporary Spanish American Novel (Formerly SPA 2240) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will read some of the most important Spanish American novels of today, and discuss them both orally and in writing. A term paper may be required. Novelists such as Asturias, Carpentier, and Garcia Marquez will be analyzed.
SPA 342 Spanish American Essay (Formerly SPA 2242) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will read, analyze, and discuss essays of modern Spanish American writers such as Alfonso, Reyes, Ezequiel Martinez Estrada, Pedro Henriquez Ureña, and Antonio S. Pedreira. Written and oral reports are required.
SPA 344 Contemporary Spanish American Theater (Formerly SPA 2244) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will analyze and discuss representative dramatic works of present-day Spanish American writers as related to the social, political, and economic conditions prevailing in the different countries. The student will compare and contrast works, formulate character analysis, and identify dramatic elements noted therein.
SPA 350 Hostos & Martí: Trailblazers for Freedom & Progress in the Americas (LAC 350) (Formerly SPA 2250) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
This course follows the lives of Eugenio María de Hostos and José Martí through their literature, their endeavors, achievements and contributions to the struggles for freedom, education and progress in the Americas. Students will read, analyze, discuss and gain an understanding of these authors' major works in a historical, political, and literary context. Students will study Hostos and Martí's historical presence in New York City in the later part of the 19th century, and their activism for the selfdetermination and social development of their peoples. Students will also gain an appreciation for similarities and differences between these two important writers, and will explore their legacies to Latin American and Latino intellectual and political pursuits..
SPA 354 The Golden Age (Formerly SPA 2254) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will read and discuss representative works of Lope, Calderon, Quevedo of the classical period, and prepare oral and written reports based on the readings and lectures presented by the instructor.
SPA 358 Modern Spanish Literature (Formerly SPA 2258) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will read representative works by Spanish authors from the Generation of 1898 to the present; participate in literary discussions based on readings and lectures presented by the instructor; and prepare both oral and written reports.
*SPA 360 The Life of Eugenio María de Hostos (LAC 360) (Formerly SPA 2260) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The course is devoted to the study of the life, works and contributions of Eugenio María de Hostos to the political, social and cultural development of Latin America and the Caribbean. Students will read, discuss and analyze Hostos' most significant works, including his literary writings, gain an understanding of this writer's work and significance in a historical context, and appreciate through exchanges with special guests and visiting scholars the relevance of Hostos' thinking to present-day Latin American and Latino issues.
*SPA 370 Extensive Readings in Spanish (Formerly SPA 2258) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
The student will read five to seven works from a list recommended by the instructor or suggested by the student and approved by the instructor. The student will submit a written report on each of the readings and meet with the instructor to discuss the reports.
*SPA 399 Special Topics in Spanish (Formerly SPA 2258) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: SPA 222 or SPA 202 or by placement
Study of selected topics dealing with language, culture and literature. Topics and title will vary from semester to semester.
VPA 111 Arts & Civilization I (Formerly VPA 3502) 3 credits, 3 hours

Co-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
An arts forum in which the student will analyze examples of the visual and performing arts of several outstanding civilizations and will discuss the role of the artists in various societies, the relationship of the arts to historical events, and the development of culture beginning with pre-historic times up to the fifteenth century. Offered in English and Spanish.
VPA 112 Arts & Civilization II (Formerly VPA 3504) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
An arts forum in which the student will analyze and discuss appropriate material (as in Arts and Civilization I) from the 15th century to the present. Offered in English and Spanish.
VPA 113 Introduction to Art (Formerly VPA 3552) 3 credits, 3 hours

Co-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
The student will analyze, discuss, and define: nature of art, meaning of art, major forms of art, and components of art; art periods, narration, description, illusion and reality, criteria for criticism, and art in New York. The student will engage in field trips and special projects.
VPA 114 Modern Art in the City 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre/Co-requisite:ENG 091 or ESL 091 or above
This course will explore the city as it has been seen through the eyes of painters, photographers, sculptors and architects on the 20th and 21st century. Using the resources of the web, students in this online course will examine the ways in which artists have responded to the city: sections of the course include 1) documenting urban society and culture; 2) cityscape and landscape; 3) the individual in the city; 4) war and the city; 5) living and working spaces in the city; 6) the family in the city.
VPA 115 Twentieth Century Art 3 credits, 3 hours

Co-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
This course surveys the principal developments in art from the end of the nineteenth century through the twentieth century: School of Paris (1865-1909), Impressionism and Post- Impressionism; School of New York (1910-present), Cubism,Futurism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Social Realism, Contemporary Black and Hispanic art.
VPA 121 Painting & Drawing I (Formerly VPA 3528) 3 credits, 3 hours
 
The beginning art student will master the basic principles of composition, design, and color through the use of collage, paint, and photographic montage; s/he will develop basic skills in the use of paint and collage materials. S/he will be required to complete at least two pictures to the satisfaction of the instructor.
VPA 122 Painting & Drawing II (Formerly VPA 3530) 3 credits, 3 hours

Co-requisite: VPA 121 or approval of the instructor
The student will analyze, discuss, and define: nature of art, meaning of art, major forms of art, and components of art; art periods, narration, description, illusion and reality, criteria for criticism, and art in New York. The student will engage in field trips and special projects.
VPA 131 Photography I (Formerly VPA 3540) 3 credits, 3 hours
 
The student will operate a 35-mm camera and light meter; expose, process, and make contact prints from film which has been shot on class assignments; use negatives which s/he has already generated in performing contact printing, editing, enlarging, and photo finishing. Offered in English and Spanish.
VPA 132 Photography II (Formerly VPA 3542) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: VPA 131 or approval of instructor
The student, with previous photographic experience, will be able to plan and execute a picture story and identify the method of other photojournalists by viewing published picture stories and books. S/he will edit and enlarge prints that s/he will present to the instructor and class. Offered in English and Spanish.
VPA 133 Digital Photography 1 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
This course introduces the student to fundamentals of twodimensional digital art forms created from original images shot with a digital camera. This course covers technical aspects of the digital image using image enhancement through photo-editing software. Imagination and originality of images and their manipulations will be emphasized.
VPA 134 Digital Photography 2 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: VPA 133
This course covers in-depth exploration of digital photography using advanced editing software for students who already have a working knowledge of the medium. The connection between original digital images, composition, ideas and attitudes will be investigated.
*VPA 135 Commercial Arts I (Formerly VPA 3544) 3 credits, 3 hours
 
The student will master specific techniques and skills used in the commercial and advertising art field. S/he will prepare paste-ups and mechanicals used in printing reproduction. S/he will assemble a portfolio of paste-up specimens of letterheads, book jackets, graphs and charts, advertisements, and brochures. The student will master entry-level skills and will produce a portfolio of artwork, which is essential to entering this field.
VPA 136 Commercial Arts II (Formerly VPA 3546) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: VPA 135 or consent of instructor
The student will master the fundamentals of graphic design and combine media skills with graphic techniques in the preparation of design projects. Beginning with the basic principles of design and layout, the student enlarges his/her concepts from rough visualizations through comprehensive and finished layouts. The student will rough up, crop, and finish original design projects which include business letterhead, book jacket, record cover, and an industrial, educational, or governmental brochure. S/he will review these pieces with the instructor and select additional works for the portfolio begun in Commercial Arts I.
VPA 137 Color and Design 3 credits, 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
Co-requisite: ENG 110
This course focuses on color and its influence upon society. Students will study color theory, historical and psychological characteristics of color, principle of design, and applications of color in industry. Students will develop color projects with paint and collage, as well as explore computer colors in an electronic environment. Topics will include color theory models and color matching, color perception and design considerations, and choosing color for multiple media.
VPA 141 Music Appreciation (Formerly VPA 3552) 3 credits, 3 hours

Co-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
The course explores the basic components of music and how these have manifested themselves in different cultures at different times in history. The students will acquire a musical vocabulary, auditory skills and an understanding of a wide range of musical styles. Offered in English and Spanish.
VPA 151 Fundamentals of Music Theory at the Piano I (Formerly VPA 3560) 3 credits, 3 hours

Co-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
Fundamentals of Music Theory at the Piano I is designed to develop a basic knowledge and practice of Music Theory as applied to the keyboard for students with no previous musical training. Topics will include melodic and rhythmic notation, intervals, scales and basic keyboard harmony. Ear training and dictation will be included, as well as simple digital sequencing.
VPA 152 Fundamentals of Music Theory at the Piano II (Formerly VPA 3562) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: VPA 3560
Fundamentals of Music Theory at the Piano II is designed to further develop a basic knowledge and practice of Music Theory as applied to the keyboard for students who completed Fundamentals of Music at the Piano 1. Minor scales, augmented and diminished intervals and chords, musical forms, nonharmonic tones and more advanced keyboard harmony will be covered. Ear training and dictation will be included, as well as more advanced digital sampling.
*VPA 153 Music Theory (Formerly VPA 3558) 3 credits, 3 hours
 
The student will discuss the physics of sound; read notation; identify pitch, beat, rhythm; write major/minor triads; identify basic chord progressions; sing solfeggio exercises; sight read; identify pitch with a given octave; play scales; and coordinate reading and playing. Offered in English and Spanish.
VPA 161 Chorus (Formerly VPA 3578) 1 credits, 3 hours
 
Pre-requisite: ability to participate in group singing The student will study and present standard and contemporary choral literature for mixed voices and appear in concert at college ceremonies and functions. Offered in English and Spanish.
VPA 171 Introduction to Theater (Formerly VPA 3582) 3 credits, 3 hours

Co-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
The student will analyze, discuss, and define the nature, meaning, and components of theater, as well as the creative collaborations that contribute to its shape and effect. The course will include field trips and special projects..
VPA 181 Acting I (Formerly Theater Production) (Formerly VPA 3598) 3 credits, 3 hours

Co-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
The student will execute physical and vocal exercises; do dramatic improvisations and readings; execute ensemble exercises; act from scripted scenes; and perform in public. Offered in English and Spanish.
VPA 182 Movement for the Actor I: Theory and Practice (Formerly VPA 107) 3 credits, 3 hours
 
This course introduces the student to a diversity of movement influences such as mime, the Alexander Technique, the Suzuki training, and Anne Bogart's Viewpoints for the stage. Methods will be used to help the student connect physically, emotionally and mentally with the challenges of the dramatic text. The student will become familiar with the different theories as well as with the application of various methods.
VPA 191 Speaking and Listening (Formerly VPA 3610) 3 credits, 3 hours


Pre-requisite: None 
Co-requisite: ESL 025

This course is an introduction to phonological and phonemic awareness of American English language designed for Intermediate ESL students. Students will understand sound structure and further develop their listening, speaking, and reading skills by using readings in poetry and drama rhymes, auditory blending, segmentation, alliteration, and drilling exercises. Students will identify and manipulate the sounds of American English and will improve their pronunciation, enunciation, and auditory skills.
VPA 192 Fundamentals of Public Speaking (Formerly VPA 3612 3 credits, 3 hours
)
Pre-requisite: ESL 035 or ESL 086
Co-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
The student will present introductions; present impromptu, extemporaneous, and manuscript speeches; perform exercises to improve public speaking technique; limit topics; create outlines; and present informative and persuasive speeches, as well as speeches for special occasions.
VPA 281 Acting II (Formerly VPA 206) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: VPA 3598 - Acting I
This course further develops the basic principles mastered in Acting I. The student will learn a diversity of exercises and improvisational work to expand the imagination and stimulate the instruments-an actor's body and mind-by increasing sensorial awareness, enabling each student to make specific and clear choices in becoming a truthful character on the stage. The emphasis will be on characterization through monologues and scene work.
VPA 282 Movement for the Actor II (Formerly VPA 207) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: VPA 107
Co-requisite: None
This course continues the work introduced in Movement for the Actor I. The student will be further challenged in a diversity of movement influences; methods and trainings will be used to help the student connect physically, emotionally, and mentally with the challenges of the dramatic text and the development of a character. The student will become familiar with different theories as well as with application of various methods.
*VPA 292 Advanced Public Speaking (Formerly VPA 3616) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: VPA 192
Co-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
The student will organize and deliver informative and persuasive speeches at an advanced level. Topics will be appropriate to academic and career situations. Students will deliver speeches from a lectern using a microphone. Selected exercises will be audio and video taped. Students will engage in analysis and criticism of the content and delivery of the speeches. Problem-solving exercises will be included.
VPA 3536 Art Crafts 3 credits, 3 hours
Pre-requisite: VPA 3598 - Acting I
The student will practice the techniques of linoleum and woodcutting. S/he will develop the use and care of tools used in various art crafts as well as work in a variety of media. S/he will be required to complete at least three pieces of work to the satisfaction of the instructor.
VPA 3614 Voice & Diction (Formerly VPA 206) 3 credits, 3 hours

Pre-requisite: ESL 025 or ESL 082/084 or higher
Co-requisite: ESL 035 or ESL 086/088 or higher; ENG 091 or ESL 091
The student will take a speech diagnostic test at the beginning of the course, and through individual and group exercises, demonstrate measurable improvement in speech production, diction, and pronunciation.The student will apply the basic radiographic procedures under the direct supervision of a qualified radiologic technologist.