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BlaCK Studies Courses
BLS 110 African Civilization I (Formerly CUB 3103) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
This course is designed to provide a broad acquaintance with African history, civilization, and culture from the earliest times to the 16th century. The course will discuss the origins and development of civilization in Africa, focusing on the oral civilizations, ancient African kingdoms, the African middle ages, traditional and foreign missionary religions, and Africa before the advent of the Europeans.
BLS 112 African Civilization II (Formerly CUB 3104) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ENG 091 or ESL 091
This course is designed to provide a broad acquaintance with modern African social history, civilization, and culture. After a quick overview of the period of Oral Civilization and the colonial partition of Africa, the continuity and development of African culture and civilization will be analyzed: its social and political institutions, its people and the growing social issues which confront African society today. The course will explore the social, political, economic, and intellectual dimensions of African life through a wide variety of readings from the various disciplines of history, anthropology, political science, literature, music, and the arts.
BLS 114 The African-American Experience (Formerly CUB 3106) 3 credits / 3 hours
The student will be introduced, through a series of guided readings, to the experiences of peoples of African descent from Africa's genesis through the middle passage, slavery, emancipation, the reconstruction and the aftermath of de jure slavery in the Americas.The literary, economic, socio-psychological, and cultural aspects of the African-American experience till the end of the 19th century will be discussed and analyzed.
BLS 116 African-American Religion (Formerly CUB 3119) 3 credits, 3 hours
The student will trace the history of African-American religion as a continuation of African religions as well as a response to the experience of the Diaspora. Major emphasis will be placed on the church as an integral part of the African-American community.
BLS 119 Diversity & Pluralism in America 3 credits / 3 hours
Co-requisite: SPA 121 or ENG 091
This foundation course is the study of various racial, ethnic and cultural and cultural components of the Americas society from the 16th century to the present. Historical and contemporary issues of the American mosiac will be surveyed as they relate to race, ethnicity, religion, cultural diversity and pluralism. The course will explore a variety of theoretical perspectives and empirical cases in assimilation, discrimination and reverse discrimination, integration, racism, segregation, social harmony, coexistence, and the future of racial and ethnic groups and cultures in the United States. This is, therefore, a course aimed at understanding and analyzing the various situations of our different and differing American populations, suggesting a comparative comprehension of various patterns of group relations.
BLS 120 Social Problems of the Minority Communities (Formerly CUB 3124) 3 credits, 3 hours
The student will analyze various aspects of social problems which affect disadvantaged and multicultural communities, including drugs, housing, welfare, and crime, with respect to their etiology, as well as strategies for amelioration.
BLS 121 African Literature (Formerly CUB 3172) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ENG 111
The student will identify the main sources and trace the thematic development of African oral and written literature. The student will discuss and evaluate the contribution of literature to African historiography. The student will discuss, analyze, and criticize representative works from such countries as Nigeria, Kenya, and Ethiopia. The works considered will be from the earliest times to the present. Credit will be awarded in either English or Africana Studies.
BLS 122 Negritude (Formerly CUB 310) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre/Co-requisites: ENG 091; ESL 091
This course is designed to explore the cultural, literary, intellectual, political, moral, artistic and social values of people of Africa and the African Diaspora as represented in the literature of the Negritude Movement. The course will trace the development of Negritude as a political, literary, cultural, moral movement which attempts to rehabilitate the people of African descent from the psychological and moral degradation of slavery, colonialism and imperialism. The inter-relationship between the Negritude Movement, the Harlem Renaissance and the Pan Africanist Movement will be explored. The critique of Negritude by Anglo-phone African writers and intellectuals will be examined. The issue of alienation, and the dilemma of the assimilated African (l'evolue, l'assimile) will be emphasized.
BLS 123 African-American Literature (Formerly CUB 3174) 3 credits / 3 hours
The student will survey the literature from the slave narratives to the present time. S/he will relate the literature to the historical and cultural context in which it is set. S/he will analyze and criticize such writers as Isaac Jefferson, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and John A. Williams. Credit will be awarded in English and Africana Studies.
BLS 125 The Harlem Renaissance (Formerly CUB 320) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre/Co-requisites: ENG 110
This course is designed to explore the socio-political environment and evolution of Afro-Americans as reflected in the literature of the Harlem Renaissance (1919-1939) in drama, fiction, poetry and other forms of artistic expression. Students will study the relation of the various changes taking place on the social and political scenes during the first four decades of the twentieth century. The birth of the "New Negro", the impact of black Art and Music first in Europe and in the United States will be treated through its literature of justification/revolt or literature of racial/ethnic promotion, cultural awareness and identity. The course will compare the works of key figures of the Harlem Renaissance such as Claude Mckay, Counte Cullen, Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer and those of writers of the "lost generation" such as Hemingway and Fitzgerald. New themes and forms developed by the Renaissance writers and their influence on succeeding generations will be studied.
BLS 131 Black-American Art (Formerly CUB 3178) 3 credits / 3 hours
The student will be able to trace the major works of art from the earliest times to the present. S/he will analyze the works of art in relation to the cultural and social conditions under which they were produced. The works of Henry Tanner, Aaron Douglas, Charles White, and others will be considered.
BLS 133 African-American Music (Formerly CUB 3180) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: VPA 141- Music Appreciation
The students will trace the music of African-Americans from Africa, their development in the Diaspora and the various musical forms up to the present time. The student will analyze the functions of the "holler," work songs, blues, jazz, and other forms.
BLS 141 The African-American & Latino Family (Formerly CUB 3116) 3 credits / 3 hours
The student will consider the family as a social institution and those behavior patterns that are specific to the African- American and Latino family. Emphasis will be placed on the affective influence of the family environment
BLS 150 Ethnicity, Health & Illness (Formerly CUB 3130) 3 credits / 3 hours
Pre-requisite: ESL 091
The student will survey the literature from the slave narratives to the present time. S/he will relate the literature to the historical and cultural context in which it is set. S/he will analyze and criticize such writers as Isaac Jefferson, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and John A. Williams. Credit will be awarded in English and Africana Studies.