Biology Courses

BIO 110 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 

lecture course syllabus (pdf format)
3 credits, 3-hrs. lecture
Pre/Corequisite: Pre-requisite:MAT 010 (formerly MAT 1604) and Eng 091 (formerly ENG 1301) or ESL 091 (formerly ESL1301).
Co-requisite: BIO111 Principles of Biology laboratory 
This course is designed to give students an overview of the principles of biology that apply to living organisms. Topics examined will include the structure and function of the cell, diffusion and osmosis, types of plant and animal tissues, molecular biology, and animal reproduction and development. The laboratory illustrates the concepts discussed in the lecture. This course is for non-science major students. Offered in Spanish and English.
BIO 111 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY LABORATORY

lab course syllabus (pdf format)
1 credits, 2-hrs. laboratory
Pre/Corequisite: Pre-requisite:MAT 010 (formerly MAT 1604) and Eng 091 (formerly ENG 1301) or ESL 091 (formerly ESL1301).
Co-requisite: BIO110 Principles of Biology lecture
This course is designed to give students an overview of the principles of biology that apply to living organisms. Topics examined will include the structure and function of the cell, diffusion and osmosis, types of plant and animal tissues, molecular biology, and animal reproduction and development. The laboratory illustrates the concepts discussed in the lecture. This course is for non-science major students. Offered in Spanish and English.
BIO 120

ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (lecture) 

course syllabus (pdf format)

4 credits, 3-hrs. lecture
Prerequisite: BIO 110
Pre/Corequisites: if taught in English: ESL 91 or ENG 91
Pre/Corequisites: if taught in Spanish: SPA 222
Lecture topics include the theory of evolution by natural selection, the evolution and diversity of organisms and their classification into the five kingdoms. Students will learn the main morphological features of each group as well as animal digestion, endocrine system, circulation, immunity, nervous system l and basic concepts of ecology. This course is for non-science major students.
BIO 121

ORGANISMIC BIOLOGY (laboratory) 

course syllabus (pdf format)

1 credit, 3 hrs. lab
Prerequisite: BIO 110, BIO 111
Laboratory topics include the theory of evolution by natural selection, the evolution and diversity of organisms and their classification into the five kingdoms. Students will learn the main morphological features of each group as well as animal digestion, endocrine system, circulation, immunity, nervous system and basic concepts of ecology. The laboratory illustrates the concepts discussed in the lecture. This course is for non-science major students. 
BIO 130

PLANTS ANS SOCIETY

course syllabus (pdf format)
3 credits, 3-hrs lecture

Prerequisite: BIO 110
Co-requisites if taught in English: ESL 91 or ENG 91. If taught in Spanish: SPA 222 Offered in English and in Spanish.

This course introduces students to the world of plants and their vital role in human life. Students will learn about plant morphology, how plants reproduce, and how they obtain energy in order to survive. The course emphasizes the role of plants in human society as sources of food, medicine, fiber, and fuel; it provides a critical review of science, technology, and the environment, in relation to plant domestication and current world food, medicine and fiber production. Social implications associated with biological and technical aspects of crop production in modern society will be studied in this class, too. Students will find many opportunities for enrichment on topics that relate plants to historical developments and environmental issues, and will have an opportunity to learn how personal choices impact global vegetation resources.

BIO 210 GENERAL BIOLOGY I 

course syllabus (pdf format)
4 credits, 3-hrs lecture/3 hrs lab
Prerequisite: ESL 91 or ENG 91; MAT 20 or Exempt

This course, the first of two courses in biological science is intended for students preparing for careers in science. Lecture topics include basic properties of living organisms, metabolism, energy transformation, cellular reproduction, Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics and gene expression. Offered in English. 
BIO 220 GENERAL BIOLOGY II (Formerly BIO 3904)

course syllabus (pdf format)
4 credits, 3-hrs. lecture/3 hrs. lab
Prerequisite: BIO 210
This is the second part of two courses in biological science intended for students preparing for careers in science. Lecture topics include the theory of evolution by natural selection, the evolution and diversity of organisms and their classification into five kingdoms. The students will learn about animal nutrition, circulation, gas exchange, homeostasis, immunity, nervous control, reproduction and development and ecology. Offered in English.
BIO 230

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 

course syllabus (pdf format)

4 credits, 3-hrs. lecture/3-hrs. lab
Corequisite: ENG 91, ESL 91 or ESL 35; MAT 20
The student will demonstrate knowledge of basic chemistry, body fluids, and the structure and function of the cell. The student will also list and describe the four kinds of animal tissue; list major bones and their function; and describe structure and function of the muscular and circulatory systems. Offered in English only.
BIO 240 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 

course syllabus (pdf format)
4 credits, 3-hrs. lecture/3-hrs. lab
Prerequisite: BIO 230
The student will study and describe the structure and function of the urinary, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, nervous, and reproductive systems. Offered in English only.
 
BIO 260 INTRODUCTION TO GENETICS 4 credits; 2 hrs. lecture/ 4 hrs. Lab
Prerequisite: BIO 220
Corequisite: MAT 160
This course focuses on topics from Mendelian, molecular and population genetics; including concepts of inheritance, history of genetics, molecular genetics using the DNA organization, chromosome structure, genes, alleles and the transmission of genetic information, and the use of genetic techniques in ecological/conservation programs Laboratory work includes experiments in Mendelian genetics using plants and animals and the study of chromosome material in bacteria.
BIO 270

FOOD MICROBIOLOGY

course syllabus (pdf format)

4 credits/ 6 hours (3 hrs lecture; 3 hrs lab)
Prerequisite: BI0 210 and/or CHE 210
This course is designed to introduce students to general principles of microbiology with an emphasis on structure, function and growth control of microorganisms important in food processing, food spoilage, and in causing food-borne illnesses. General microbiology topics covered in this course include structure and function of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, metabolism, growth of bacterial culture, pathogenic properties of microorganisms, and interaction between microbe and host. Food microbiology topics covered in this course include lactic acid bacteria and theirfermentation products, spoilage microorganisms and control of their growth in food, food borne pathogenic bacteria and control of their growth in food, and methods of identification and quantification of microorganisms in food..
BIO 299 INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN BIOLOGY 3 credits, 3 hours.
Prerequisite: BIO 220 and CHE 220 with a minimum grade of B
This course is designed to help students study particular topics of interest in the biological sciences while developing advanced research skills fundamental in planning and carrying out an independent scientific research project. Students will conduct laboratory, field research or library research using sophisticated methodology equipment and techniques to obtain and analyze data. The research findings will be presented using oral and written papers.
BIO 310

MICROBIOLOGY (Formerly BIO 3912)

course syllabus (pdf format)

4 credits, 3-hrs. lecture/3-hrs. lab
Prerequisite: BIO 220 or 240
The student will study and describe terms related to the following aspects of microbiology: history, methods of studying and cultivation, reproduction and growth, metabolism, genetics, and control. The student will also study the following topics: pathogens, resistance and immunity, bacteria, rickettsia, chlamydia, viruses, parasitology, mycology, and epidemiology. Offered in English only.
FS 101

INTRODUCTION TO FOOD SYSTEMS

course syllabus (pdf format)

3 Credits/3hours
Prerequisite: ENG 091; ENG 092
Corequisite: ENG 110
This course provides students with fundamental knowledge of the food system and all of its components (e.g., agricultural production, consumption, regional linkages, food and agricultural policies). The course begins with an overview of food systems and the field of food studies and progresses through in-depth examination of the food system from a social sciencelens and a social justice framework. It also examines alternative food movements and includes examples of community groups working to improve the food system in New York City. The finalsessions of this course are dedicated to discussions about employment in the food sector and academic fields of study that address aspects of the food system. The course includes field trips and/or guest lectures to complement readings, assignments, and in-class discussions.
FS 120

FOOD STUDIES II: FOOD, ENVIRONMENT, AND JUSTICE

course syllabus (pdf format)

3 Credits/3hours
Prerequisite: FS 101 and BIO 110 or 210 or BIO 120
This course is a continuation of Food Studies I, delving more deeply into environmental aspects of the food system from natural science and environmental justice perspectives. Topics include methods of agricultural production and how they impact and are impacted by natural systems; nutrient cycling in agriculture and food systems; environmental impacts of food processing, packaging, transportation, and waste disposal. Environmental justice implications of course topics are also discussed. The course includes field trips and/or guest lectures.
FS 200

FOOD POLICY, ADVOCACY AND ACTIVISM

course syllabus (pdf format)

3 Credits/3 hours
Prerequisite: FS 101, FS 120
This course explores food policy making, food activism, and policy advocacy initiatives at local, regional , national , and international scales. We begin by discussing the concepts of food policyand food advocacy, and proceed to examine how food policy making intersects with and impacts public health, environment, and the regional food  system. Jobs in food policy and advocacy sectors are discussed throughout the semester, and guest speakers are invited to contextualize course concepts in the New  York  City environment.
FS 220

FOOD, HEALTH, AND ENVIRONMENT

course syllabus (pdf format)

3 Credits/3hours
Prerequisite: FS I and FS II
This course examines the interactions between food production and consumption, health, and environment through environmental and food justice lenses. Building on concepts developed in Food Systems I and II, it explores topics such as public health disparities and their structural causes, environmental toxins in the food system and their impact on workers and consumers, as well as policies that have or could impact these outcomes, in both historical and contemporary contexts. Students will work together to apply classroom knowledge to investigating food security and health at the neighborhood level in NYC. The courseincludes field trips and/or guest lectures to complement readings, assignments, and in class discussions.
FS 225

FOOD STUDIES CAREER PRACTICES

course syllabus (pdf format)

1 Credit/1hour
Prerequisite: FS 101; FS 120
Corequisite: FS 200 OR FS 220
This course prepares students to pursue career and/or future academic opportunities following the completion of their Food Studies Associate's Degree. The course covers identification of career goals; job and academic program search skills; development of effective resumes and cover letters; interviewing skills; entrepreneurship; and employee rights. The course also walks students through the process of identifying a site for the required Food Studies internship, as well as aspects of applying/transferring to Bachelor 's program, as appropriate. The course includespresentations from Hostos Community College Career Services, Transfer Services, and other key campus and off-campus resource centers.
FS 230

FOOD STUDIES CAPSTONE

course syllabus (pdf format)

3 Credits/3hours
Prerequisite: FS I and FS II
Corequisite: FS 120 or FS 200 and FS 225
Open to Food Studies majors only.
This course guides students through completion of the Food Studies Associates program and the required Food Studies internship, and is required of all majors. The course integratesconceptual learning, skill-building, and experiential learning to enable students to demonstrate strong foundational knowledge about food studies and food systems. We reflect on key conceptsexamined in the Food Studies core courses, and draw connections between these concepts, the field based/internship experiences, and students'specific career objectives. By the end of theterm, students will have completed their internship; a final paper contextualizing the internship within concepts learned through the Food  Studies program; and an e-Portfolio to be used infuture applications for employment and other post-graduate opportunities. Students will also give a final presentation about their internship experience in an end-of semester program  seminar.

Courses identified with an asterisk (*) will be offered when there is sufficient demand.